Spread the Word: template tweets, facebook posts, and emails to libraries

Copy, paste, and send (or print and send) the template Tweet, Facebook post, and email / letter below to your local school or public library to ask them to help combat stereotypes by taking part in RGA UK’s ‘#SpreadTheWord’ book campaign!

To find your local library visit https://www.gov.uk/local-library-services or http://www.findmylibrary.co.uk/.

For EMAILS, please put **FAO Librarian in charge of Children’s Stock Selection** in the subject.

Note: the email to school libraries is at the bottom of this page.

 

TWEET

Hi @xxx. I support @RGAUK #SpreadTheWord campaign. Do you stock these books? http://rgauk.org/spread-word-template-tweets-facebook-posts-emails-libraries

FACEBOOK POST

Hi [INSERT LIBRARY NAME]. I’m supporting RGA UK’s ‘Spread the Word’ campaign. We want to promote more positive and accurate depictions of people with dwarfism who are otherwise often widely mischaracterised as people from fairy tales, myths, and fantasy stories. Do you stock these books (http://rgauk.org/spread-word-template-tweets-facebook-posts-emails-libraries)? If not, please could they be ordered? It’d be great if we could get the authors in to visit!

PUBLIC LIBRARIES EMAIL

[BEGINS]

Dear Sir or Madam:

I hope you’re well.

I’m writing to suggest the items to be ordered by [INSERT NAME OF LIBRARY HERE].

These are:

  • Strong and Mighty Max / Kristina GRAY / Matador /ISBN 9781785890468
  • We are Giants / Amber Lee DODD / Quercus Children’s Books / ISBN 9781784294212
  • I can’t not never be very tall / Susan HATTON / CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform / ISBN 13: 9781499717747

Strong and Mighty Max is a children’s story aimed at Early Years and Key Stage 1. Max was born with Achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism. He explains that Achondroplasia is a ‘big word’ and not a special ‘superpower’; it simply means his bones grow differently. This is a wonderfully illustrated story encouraging discussion about how everyone is born different.

‘We Are Giants’ is for readers aged 9 and older and written from the view of a young girl called Sydney, who lives with her sister Jade and her mum, Amy. Amy was born with a condition called dwarfism, which means that she got to the height of 4ft then stopped growing altogether. Her deceased husband also had dwarfism so when Amy gave birth to two average-sized daughters, lots of people were sceptical about whether she could take care of them adequately. Perfect for young fans of Jacqueline Wilson, who has endorsed this debut author. Click here for The Guardian’s review of We Are Giants. It was also nominated for a number of national awards including the 2017 Branford Boase award for most promising children’s debut novel and Longlisted for the 2017 Waterstones’ children’s fiction award.

I can’t not never be very tall: is aimed at Early Years and KS1. Jessica was born with Achondroplasia, Dwarfism. This book is designed to help others around her to understand a little more about her and how imperfectly perfect she really is. Being small means she only needs a little more time to do everything the other children can do.

My request comes as part of the ‘Spread the Word’ campaign, led by dwarfism charity RGA UK, to promote positive and accurate depictions of people with dwarfism who are otherwise widely mischaracterised as people from fairy tables, myths, and fantasy stories. We believe such misrepresentations can perpetuate stereotypes and prejudice. Books such as these help introduce children to dwarfism, disability, and difference – in a positive and realistic light.

Both Kristina and Amber have some availability to visit libraries and schools and talk to children about their books as part of the ‘Spread The Word’ campaign and it would be fantastic if you or a member of your team could look into arranging this

I hope [INSERT LIBRARY NAME HERE] will be able to accommodate my requests and I look forward to hearing from you.

Much appreciated.

[INSERT NAME HERE]

 

[ENDS]

————————————————————————————————————————————————-

SCHOOL LIBRARIES EMAIL

 

Dear [INSERT LIBRARIAN / TEACHER NAME HERE]:

I hope you’re well.

I am a / my child is [DELETE AS APPROPRIATE] pupil at [INSERT SCHOOL] NAME.

I’m writing to suggest the items to be ordered by [INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL LIBRARY HERE].

These are:

  • Strong and Mighty Max / Kristina GRAY / Matador /ISBN 9781785890468
  • We are Giants / Amber Lee DODD / Quercus Children’s Books / ISBN 9781784294212
  • I can’t not never be very tall / Susan HATTON / CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform / ISBN 13: 9781499717747

Strong and Mighty Max is a children’s story aimed at Early Years and Key Stage 1. Max was born with Achondroplasia, a form of dwarfism. He explains that Achondroplasia is a ‘big word’ and not a special ‘superpower’; it simply means his bones grow differently. This is a wonderfully illustrated story encouraging discussion about how everyone is born different.

‘We Are Giants’ is for readers aged 9 and older and written from the view of a young girl called Sydney, who lives with her sister Jade and her mum, Amy. Amy was born with a condition called dwarfism, which means that she got to the height of 4ft then stopped growing altogether. Her deceased husband also had dwarfism so when Amy gave birth to two average-sized daughters, lots of people were sceptical about whether she could take care of them adequately. Perfect for young fans of Jacqueline Wilson, who has endorsed this debut author. Click here for The Guardian’s review of We Are Giants. It was also nominated for a number of national awards including the 2017 Branford Boase award for most promising children’s debut novel and Longlisted for the 2017 Waterstones’ children’s fiction award.

I can’t not never be very tall: is aimed at Early Years and KS1. Jessica was born with Achondroplasia, Dwarfism. This book is designed to help others around her to understand a little more about her and how imperfectly perfect she really is. Being small means she only needs a little more time to do everything the other children can do.

My request comes as part of the ‘Spread The Word’ campaign, led by dwarfism charity RGA UK, to promote positive and accurate depictions of people with dwarfism who are otherwise widely mischaracterised as people from fairy tables, myths, and fantasy stories. We believe such misrepresentations can perpetuate stereotypes and prejudice. Books such as these help introduce children to dwarfism, disability, and difference – in a positive and realistic light.

Both Kristina and Amber have some availability to visit libraries and schools and talk to children about their books and it would be fantastic if you or a member of your team could look into arranging this

I hope [INSERT SCHOOL LIBRARY NAME HERE] will be able to accommodate my request and I look forward to hearing from you.

Much appreciated.

[INSERT CHLD / PARENT NAME HERE]

Leave.EU ‘Turf out the dwarf’ campaign ‘disablist’ and ‘disgraceful’, says RGA UK

A leading charity for people with dwarfism has slammed a Leave.EU social media campaign – which showed a photo-shopped image of the House of Commons Speaker, John Bercow MP, as a dwarf about to be thrown by a group of men, with the banner and hashtag ‘Turf Out the Dwarf’ – as ‘disgraceful’ and ‘disablist’.

The image and slogan were tweeted by @Leave.EU, supposedly in response to Mr Bercow’s recent comments about US President Donald Trump speaking in Parliament.

A RGA UK spokesman said: “Whatever your politics, we hope most people would agree that using the term ‘dwarf’ as a slur and celebrating – as this picture does – acts of physical violence against people with dwarfism is disgraceful and disablist.

“This isn’t about ‘political correctness’; it’s about dwarfism still being an acceptable target for prejudice and abuse.

“It’s a sad reminder that we still have far to go, as a society.”

At the time of writing, the Tweet can still be seen on the @Leave.EU twitter feed.